16.12.06

Stories and Ghosts

The trees outside were dripping with moisture, the air cold and fresh. Once through the large doors of our garden wall we could see icy mist mingling with fragrant wood smoke giving the lanterns their Christmas halos and making the street jet slick. We made our way through the cold moist air in the dark, chattering about how chilly it was and where we wanted to eat.

We had always wondered about the little tiny bistro tucked in the side of a series of medieval “Ruelles” (allies) on our path to the market. The Raclette Bistro had always been shuttered up tight, dark and brown, but tonight on my way home from errands it was bright with light. I could see a new coat of yellow paint making it look decidedly open for business. Shall we try our luck?? Once out of the cold and into the warmth of that yellow, we were greeted by the new owner. Seems we were the first customers for the night (that would the Canadians who eat well before the anytime-after-7:30-French). He was delighted to have us and even spoke a little English, astoundingly pretty much the first time since we had arrived 2 ½ years ago.

The place, with its immense low beamed ceiling and ancient red burnished tiles began to feel cozy and warm as it filled and we settled into our wine. Beside us in the old stone wall there was a cubby with a great hand carved slab holding a candle. Perhaps it was an ancient cold store for meat or cheese? To the right of it, a bricked up window, or perhaps a short doorway for long gone wooden stairwells up or down. We wondered.

I can’t help but think about the many souls who have lived, loved and laughed in a place like that bistro, some odd 500 years ago after the first corner stone had been dragged into place. The stories and the ghosts. With it’s position in the alley it could have been many things, a hat shop, maybe an apothecary with herbs and love potions, perhaps a stable, blacksmiths, or even brothel? The stone endures, silent witness to the craftsmen who have altered them, never revealing their secrets.

9 comments:

traveller one said...

That's pretty :)
Kim

I see you have a link to one of my blogs (sometimes I cook) that I rarely update. Perhaps you'd like reading my much more used one at
www.acrossthelana.blogspot.com

oreneta said...

Was it good?????? It is amazing these ancient places that are refurbished again and again....

Dorky Dad said...

Yeah ... it sounds like a great place, but how was the food? FOOD!

sarah said...

If only walls could talk...I'd love to hear what these French ones would say! (Oh well, I probably wouldn't understand it anyway!)

Yeah so how was the food? That place looks so neat.

Nomad said...

The food was great, but even more amazing we felt like we were among friends, (a rare sentiment around here), we had a "Raclette Savoyarde" (from Savoie) sort of like a combination of an electric heater and a half round of cheese, melted bit by bit on top of ham and yummy sausage and new bolied potoatoes..truly mountain food...with a nice sharp white wine(I forget what...)...yum yum YUM...

Trish said...

Sounds devine!!

Cheese melted on anything is just delish...the ambiance and the wine makes it special.

Karitown said...

Sounds awesome. So glad it turned out nice for you.

Sam said...

A raclette bistro? Heaven!!!

Yes, I bet the food was great and many souls in the past have enjoyed this place :-)

I fully agree with Trish, raclette is divine!

Nomad said...
This comment has been removed by the author.

Snapshot

My photo
Paris, France
A Canadian expatriate living and exploring first France now Germany, then BACK to FRANCE (!!!) with her family; former fashion designer, turned unexpected UNLIKELY NOMAD, raising two children, writing, photographing, painting, playing piano (who knew!!) and blogging - and now... full time student at ART SCHOOL!! (I MUST be crazy!!)